Financial Health – Amiya Sahu http://amiyasahu.com/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 01:14:41 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://amiyasahu.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-150x150.png Financial Health – Amiya Sahu http://amiyasahu.com/ 32 32 Antioch residents rally for safe and affordable housing in response to blatant rent increases https://amiyasahu.com/antioch-residents-rally-for-safe-and-affordable-housing-in-response-to-blatant-rent-increases/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 01:14:41 +0000 https://amiyasahu.com/antioch-residents-rally-for-safe-and-affordable-housing-in-response-to-blatant-rent-increases/ Parent advocates release new report highlighting need for stronger protections for tenants in Antioch Endless worries about landlords raising rents, travel and livability issues highlighted among 1,000 Antioch residents in survey Antioch, California – Advocates held a rally on June 22, 2022 to demand safe, affordable housing and an immediate halt to exorbitant rent increases. […]]]>

Parent advocates release new report highlighting need for stronger protections for tenants in Antioch

Endless worries about landlords raising rents, travel and livability issues highlighted among 1,000 Antioch residents in survey

Antioch, California – Advocates held a rally on June 22, 2022 to demand safe, affordable housing and an immediate halt to exorbitant rent increases. Low-income tenants at Delta Pines Apartments and Casa Blanca Apartmentstwo government-subsidized affordable housing buildings are facing potential relocation after their corporate landlord recently raised monthly rents by as much as $500.

Prior to the rally, attendees gathered in the Lowe’s parking lot near 1951 Auto Center Drive, where they marched to the Delta Pines apartments while holding signs and singing.

Residents of Delta Pines and Case Blanca aren’t the only ones facing sudden rent increases. A new survey of Antioch residents released today finds that rent hikes and housing instability are widespread across the city. Seventy-nine percent of tenants say they worry about rent increases, while 68% worry about being able to pay their current rent.

Local parents defend the interests of East County Regional Group (ECRG), sponsored by The first 5 Against Costaconducted the community survey of over 1,000 residents of Antioch to understand their housing challenges and needs.

The rally was organized by the ECRG, First 5 Contra Costa and the Alliance of Californians for Community Empowerment (ACCE). Residents of Delta Pines, Casa Blanca, and community members with ECRG spoke about their first-hand experiences with unaffordable rent, eviction fears, and landlord harassment.

Speakers shared survey data showing the need for tenant protection for families in Antioch. The event will be in coordination with ACCE’s statewide day of action to highlight abuses by business owners.

“Housing insecurity is a threat to our basic humanity,” said Rocheall Pierre, a resident of Antioch and an active ECRG member who will speak at the rally. “Living in Antioch challenges every parent, no matter where they are from or what their income, to find a safe and dignified place to raise their family. I live in a corporate owned building and am paying $1800 for a one bedroom apartment for me and my son. After the rent, there is not enough left to cover emergency expenses. I had to take out payday loans, which put me in more debt. Antioch’s housing system is broken and prioritizes landlords over local families. »

The new report “Antioch CHANGE: A Community Housing Assessment of Needs, Gaps and Equity in Antioch, California” is a partnership between the ECRG, First 5 Contra Costa, Healthy & Active Before 5 and Urban Habitat. Survey responses were collected in 2021, and the process was guided by resident leadership and community-based participatory research principles. Although the survey can be completed online, 81% of responses were collected individually by ECRG leaders using tablets and paper surveys. Promotion of the survey included social media, telephone banking, door-to-door and talking to residents at community events, vaccination sites, laundromats, grocery stores, parks, local clinics, churches and service organizations.

Key findings of the report include:

  • On average, respondents paid 63% of their monthly income in rent, leaving little for food, medicine, childcare and other basic necessities.
  • Fifty-one percent of tenants said they were worried about eviction and 64 percent were worried their deposits wouldn’t be returned when they moved out.
  • Low-income residents of color and families with young children are the most housing insecure, reporting a higher rent burden, fears of displacement and livability issues. Among tenants with young children, 83% worried about rent increases and 75% worried about not being able to pay the rent.

“Everyone needs a safe, stable and healthy place to call home, and this is especially important for young children,” said Rhea Elina Laughlin, community engagement program manager at First 5 Contra Costa. “The early experiences of young children are critical to their future learning and well-being. These egregious rent hikes and the lack of affordable housing in Antioch have only deepened the city’s deep-rooted racial and economic inequalities and put the well-being of our children and the community as a whole at risk. Local tenant protection policies are urgently needed.

More than four in five tenants and landlords surveyed said they want the city of Antioch to take action to limit annual rent increases, prevent unfair evictions, create pathways to home ownership and build housing more affordable. For residents of Antioch, especially low-income families of color struggling with unaffordable rents, housing instability is a daily concern. In addition to rent increases and threats of eviction, families are harassed by landlords and property managers. Without protections, families are forced to make the impossible choice of living in uninhabitable conditions or becoming homeless.

Drawing on decades of resident organizing and advocacy for housing justice, the report includes policy recommendations for leaders in Antioch. Policies advocated in the report include:

  • Implementation of rent control,
  • Require just cause for eviction, and
  • Enact tenant anti-harassment ordinances.

Supporters of the 22nd action will demand that the leaders of the city of Antioch adopt these policy recommendations. On June 14, Concord City Council passed a new anti-harassment policy for tenants. The policy puts in place new protections for tenants facing abusive landlords who threaten, harass and intimidate them. Owners who violate the policy may be fined.

Community members at the rally spoke out in favor of including strong tenant protections in the housing component of the city’s overall plan. The housing element, which is only updated once every eight years, describes how the city will achieve its housing goals and provides an opportunity to address past inequalities.

The full report “Antioch CHANGE: A Community Housing Assessment of Needs, Gaps and Equity in Antioch, California” will be available here on June 22 at 9:00 a.m.

About the East County Regional Group:

East County Regional Group is a volunteer parent advocacy group working to make East Contra Costa healthier, safer and fairer for young children and families. The ECRG is sponsored by First 5 Contra Costa’s Community Engagement and Advocacy Program.

About First 5 Contra Costa:

First 5 Contra Costa helps young children start school healthy, nourished and ready to learn by investing in child-centered programs and activities during their first five years, the most important period of child development. children.

About the Alliance of Californians for Community Empowerment (ACCE) Stock:

The Alliance of Californians for Community Empowerment (ACCE) Action is a local, member-driven, statewide community organization that works with more than 16,000 members across California. ACCE is dedicated to raising the voices of everyday Californians, neighborhood by neighborhood, to fight for the policies and programs we need to improve our communities and create a better future.

About Healthy & Active Before 5 (HAB45):

Healthy & Active Before 5 (HAB45) is a Contra Costa collaboration that advances health equity through local policy and environmental change to support the health and well-being of young children and their families. HAB45 provides regional groups with technical assistance and data support.

About Urban Habitat:

Urban Habitat (UH) works to democratize power and advance equitable policies to create a just and connected Bay Area for low-income communities of color. Through strategic partnerships, UH supports the increased power and capacity of low-income communities and communities of color.

]]>
Amy wanted to get rid of 34HH boobs until she found OnlyFans and made £40,000 in a month https://amiyasahu.com/amy-wanted-to-get-rid-of-34hh-boobs-until-she-found-onlyfans-and-made-40000-in-a-month/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 13:23:27 +0000 https://amiyasahu.com/amy-wanted-to-get-rid-of-34hh-boobs-until-she-found-onlyfans-and-made-40000-in-a-month/ A woman who wanted a cut to stop people staring at her 34HH boobs is now earning £40,000 a month on OnlyFans and has paid off her family’s total debt of £130,000. Amy Sophia, 27, from Leeds, was so insecure about her ‘huge boobs’ that she used to try to hide her figure in baggy […]]]>

A woman who wanted a cut to stop people staring at her 34HH boobs is now earning £40,000 a month on OnlyFans and has paid off her family’s total debt of £130,000. Amy Sophia, 27, from Leeds, was so insecure about her ‘huge boobs’ that she used to try to hide her figure in baggy jumpers or tight clothes that would ‘crush’ her chest.

When she went clubbing with friends, she says strangers made comments and looks that depressed her. “Usually when I went to clubs or out in public it was the women who would tell me to ‘put it away’ because their boyfriends were staring at me,” Amy said.

“I usually ignore it, but I once got kicked out of a nightclub for flashing this girl who told me to cover up. I was just fed up. I have such bad posture from the way I was always leaning forward to hide my boobs because when I kept my back straight it made them even more prominent and I hated that attention.

“Now the looks and comments don’t bother me anymore. I know they’re just jealous or they have body issues, they’re obviously not happy in their own skin.

Amy was working five days a week as a spa therapist earning £8.50 an hour when she decided to set up an OnlyFans page in October 2019. She says the site gave her confidence and helped her embrace her curvy figure.

When she joined she was saddled with debts of £30,000 from payday loans. Amy said: “I’ve always wanted a champagne lifestyle on a Coca Cola budget. I went on vacation abroad and always bought new clothes.

“Because of the high interest rates on payday loans, I was stuck in a vicious cycle. Then there was a buzz around this new site, OnlyFans, and something just told me to do it. for money.

“I knew my boobs were getting attention, so I decided to use them to my advantage instead of hiding. In my first month I made £7000 which was insane.

“Every month it was increasing – my best month of income was £150,000, but I average around £40,000 now.”

As well as paying off her own debt of £30,000, Amy was also able to help her parents pay off a combined debt of nearly £100,000. She said: “Helping my family out of debt was the first thing I did with the money.

“It took me about four or five months before I started winning big before I could do it. Mom was so grateful. She’s fully supportive of what I’m doing and always has been from the start.

“The people who are important to me in my family have supported me and that’s all that matters. I’m so lucky to have such an understanding family behind me. I love them so much.”

As a teenager, the model’s figure “changed overnight” as she struggled to embrace her curvy new figure. She said: “I woke up one day when I was about 15 and it’s almost like my boobs just grew overnight, they were huge.



Amy Sophia (Press Jam)

“I slowly started to dislike them as they got bigger and bigger. I felt like I had a hard time hiding them and people looked at me a lot. I avoided certain exercises at the gym and I had trouble buying clothes because they didn’t suit me or I was worried that everything would look too slutty.

At 23, she went to see a doctor about breast reduction, but the details of the operation were so daunting that Amy took longer to think about it. She said: “I was sick of the attention, of the men watching.

“I couldn’t like shopping and buying nice clothes. I also felt like my big chest made me look fat because it hid my shape in the clothes.

“I learned how serious a reduction is, so I took my time to think about it. But during that time of reflection, I discovered Only Fans.

“That’s when I started kissing them. The positive attention has really changed my mindset.



Amy Sophia (Press Jam)
Amy Sophia (Press Jam)

“I realized that a lot of guys there love my boobs and now they are my sources of money.”

Amy likes to spend her earnings on clothes, fine dining and luxury travel – and has been to Mexico, the Maldives, Rome, Thailand, Las Vegas and all over Europe. She also had a Brazilian butt lift to further enhance her figure.

The model added, “I’ve always wanted beautiful things and to do the beautiful things in life. Now I can live the life I always dreamed of and wanted so badly.

“I do what I do for the money, which gives me freedom, and freedom is everything to me.”

]]>
The key to reducing child poverty? Child tax credits distributed monthly https://amiyasahu.com/the-key-to-reducing-child-poverty-child-tax-credits-distributed-monthly/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 20:00:00 +0000 https://amiyasahu.com/the-key-to-reducing-child-poverty-child-tax-credits-distributed-monthly/ With last month’s extraordinary 8.3% inflation rate pushing Americans down, rapidly rising costs associated with food, fuel, housing and child care are putting countless families in financial danger. Knowing that the nation would face continued economic pressure from the pandemic, the US government adopted and implemented an ambitious policy agenda last year, which included the […]]]>

With last month’s extraordinary 8.3% inflation rate pushing Americans down, rapidly rising costs associated with food, fuel, housing and child care are putting countless families in financial danger.

Knowing that the nation would face continued economic pressure from the pandemic, the US government adopted and implemented an ambitious policy agenda last year, which included the expanded Child Tax Credit (CTC) program. In just six months, this landmark initiative has dramatically reduced child poverty and injected local economies with an estimated $19 billion per month in additional spending.

One of the main reasons for the success of the child tax credit? Checks are paid into parents’ bank accounts once a month.

This idea is not new. Just look at the country’s most effective anti-poverty program – Social Security – which distributes benefits to recipients throughout the year. We know that Social Security protects older Americans from poverty, but — as columnist Bryce Covert recently pointed out in The New York Times — America has chosen not to prioritize children in the same way.

The fact that CTC payments were distributed monthly as part of the US bailout is key to understanding why this direct cash program worked so well and why 3.7 million more children are living in poverty after the Congress authorized the program to expire at the end of last year. .

New analysis from the Columbia University Center on Poverty and Social Policy proves this point directly, breaking down the anti-poverty benefits of monthly CTC and showing that monthly payments are more effective than an annual lump sum.

When CTC payments are distributed once a year at tax time, child poverty drops significantly by about eleven percentage points or from 22.4% to 11%. However, anti-poverty benefits often decline in May. Compare that to monthly payments – which keep almost a third more children out of poverty each month they are distributed, according to Columbia findings..

According to this report, monthly Child Tax Credit payments could prevent about one in 10 children from experiencing a period of poverty at any time of the year, compared to annual payments, which often alleviate poverty for only one or two months during tax time.

Monthly checks reduce child poverty throughout the year by reducing income volatility, which destabilizes the month-to-month fluctuations in income that affect low-income families the most. Not only do monthly payments reduce the risk of children being persistently poor, they also reduce the risk of children becoming poor throughout the year.

The Columbia data shows what we actually saw in real life when the Child Tax Credit was in effect.

When CTC checks began hitting bank accounts in July 2021, the impact of credit on life was immediately clear. In six weeks, food insufficiency decreased by about a quarter. The improvements were significant among black and Hispanic families, who experience the highest rates of eating difficulties.

As we navigate this “new normal,” we cannot forget this important lesson of the US bailout: monthly cash payments prevent children from falling into poverty. These payments also help families in other valuable ways. Bills come in every month, and monthly CTC checks help buy groceries, pay bills, and pay rent or mortgage on time. In a survey of low-income families, three-quarters of SNAP recipients used their CTC payments on bills, including to avoid utility cuts, evictions and foreclosures. Families across the country have been able to take a breath of fresh air and report feeling less financial stress thanks to the CTC.

Economists are still learning about the long-term impact of the child tax credit on the financial health of American families. However, preliminary data – as well as the real-life experiences of millions of families – show that the monthly CTC payments not only had no discernible negative effect on employment, but supported work and life. entrepreneurial spirit among some parents. Additionally, monthly CTC payments have helped parents reduce their credit card debt and reduce their reliance on payday loans, pawnshops, and even the sale of blood plasma.

Monthly payments have been a key part of CTC’s success, and that model must be maintained if — and when — Congress brings the program back to life.

Christine Hamilton is a postdoctoral fellow at the Center on Poverty and Social Policy at Columbia University School of Social Work.

Natalie Foster is the president and co-founder of the Economic Security Project, a network committed to advancing the conversation about cash benefits and basic income in the United States.

]]>
Personal loan ads on social networks https://amiyasahu.com/personal-loan-ads-on-social-networks/ Sun, 12 Jun 2022 00:07:08 +0000 https://amiyasahu.com/personal-loan-ads-on-social-networks/ The past few years have been difficult for many Americans. Unfortunately, trying to stretch every dollar to buy basic necessities has become the norm. Some might consider a second or third job to pay the bills. This is precisely the type of person that payday loans target. Promising quick cash without telling the full story […]]]>

The past few years have been difficult for many Americans. Unfortunately, trying to stretch every dollar to buy basic necessities has become the norm. Some might consider a second or third job to pay the bills.

This is precisely the type of person that payday loans target. Promising quick cash without telling the full story of loan costs, these ads have been popping up on social media platforms like TikTok.

Read on to find out how these companies are bending the rules and why taking a payday loan is bad.

Here is the backstory

All social media platforms have advertising as it is the main way to generate profit. But some sites are not as strict about ad content as others. For example, TikTok claims to have a policy against “exaggerated performance or promises”.

Yet, there are many payday loan messages that target vulnerable users. According to Media Matters for America, three companies are systematically violating TikTok’s advertising policies by promoting payday loans.

Promising instant cash, posts by Earnin, Brigit and Albert target those in need of quick cash with phrasing such as “living paycheck to paycheck” or always being “broke”. It is unclear how advertising is allowed to be on the platform.

TikTok Payday Loans
Credit: Media Matters for America

But Earnin is no stranger to controversy. The company settled a $12.5 million lawsuit three years ago for deceptive lending practices. Brigit and Albert are also not registered with the Better Business Bureau (BBB), as some users claimed there were unexpected charges or missing deposits.

What can you do about it

It may seem like a lucrative opportunity to get some quick cash in your wallet, but there will always be a catch. The interest rate will be exorbitant, and they don’t call it often. Some advertisements will use words such as “fee” or “tip” without mentioning the interest rate.

According to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, a two-week payday loan with a $15 fee to borrow $100 gives you an annual percentage rate of 400%. That’s way more than the typical 30% for a high-interest credit card.

This can leave you in a cycle of debt, but according to the BBB, there are safer alternatives to payday loans:

  • Build a budget with an emergency fund. Create a budget so you know how much money you receive and how much you need to pay your bills. This will help avoid needing a loan in the first place. Then set aside money each month to build an emergency fund. You will be covered even if an unexpected expense or emergency occurs.
  • Get credit advice. Get credit counseling if you find yourself unable to pay your bills or caught in a cycle of debt due to a high-interest loan. The US Department of Justice has a list of agencies for people seeking debt reduction assistance. Also see BBB’s advice on credit counseling for more resources.
  • Shop for loans. Compare interest rates, fees and late fees by reading the fine print before choosing a lender. Pay close attention to interest rates and loan rollover fees. Credit unions are a great place to get a small loan with reasonable interest rates. Even credit card cash advances, which typically have double-digit interest rates, likely have lower interest rates than those offered by a payday lender.
  • Contact your creditors if you cannot pay on time. If you realize you won’t be able to make a payment on time, don’t panic. Contact the creditor directly. Many creditors are willing to work with you to design a payment plan you can afford.

keep reading

These family plans will save you money, even if you’re not family

Check to see if any of these outdated gadgets are selling big bucks on eBay

]]>
UK’s credit spread will widen in this cost of living crisis https://amiyasahu.com/uks-credit-spread-will-widen-in-this-cost-of-living-crisis/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 03:00:11 +0000 https://amiyasahu.com/uks-credit-spread-will-widen-in-this-cost-of-living-crisis/ This article is the last part of the FT’s Financial Education and Inclusion Campaign Just a year ago, the financial regulator seemed confident that tighter regulation of high-cost loans has failed to drive those in need toward loan sharks and illegal lenders. The proof was that people either went without or turned to friends and […]]]>

This article is the last part of the FT’s Financial Education and Inclusion Campaign

Just a year ago, the financial regulator seemed confident that tighter regulation of high-cost loans has failed to drive those in need toward loan sharks and illegal lenders. The proof was that people either went without or turned to friends and family for help.

You wonder if the Financial Conduct Authority is just as sure now. Leaving aside the fact that seemingly benign borrowings from friends and family, which have indeed surged since 2017, may turn out to be anything but. Against the backdrop of the greatest pressure on living standards in generations, the gap left by the multitude of exits from the subprime loan market last year should be felt.

This is not to say that the regulator and the financial ombudsman were wrong to crack down on fraudulent payday loans or repeat loans and that they paid little attention to affordability in areas such as home or home loan. Even some in the industry admit that there were sketchy practices that needed to be eradicated.

But the pressure, which saw home-based lender Provident Financial exit the market and others like Amigo stop lending, was followed by no proper assessment of what was to come. Indeed, the analysis of what happened to people who once relied on the sector is patchy at best.

What we do know is that the number of loans issued in the short-term credit and high-cost mortgage sectors fell by more than 3.2 million in 2021 compared to 2019 (after the disappearance of the lender Wonga payday), or around £1 billion. And that the number of people who find themselves excluded from mainstream provision, already estimated at 11 million, is almost certainly up, not down.

The biggest banks, which already refuse to serve the poorest in society, will pull the credit drawbridge further in a downturn. Meanwhile, rising energy and food bills, as well as other expenses, could easily add £120-150 per calendar month to expenses on an affordability check, an expert notes. Around a fifth of UK adults have less than £100 in savings.

FT COP

Donate to the Financial Education and Inclusion Campaign here

It seems likely that the explosive growth of the unregulated buy-now-pay-later BNPL market has filled some of the void, potentially substituting a low-cost or no-cost source of credit for what used to be very expensive. A community finance organisation, a sector which tends to serve a similar demographic to high-cost moneylenders (and indeed loan sharks) in terms of high proportions of benefit recipients and incomes under £20,000, said that BNPL had become by far the main form of credit with their customers since 2020.

This echoes concerns about “stacked” BNPL loans, the use of these facilities to meet basic needs such as energy costs, and some suggestions that those dependent on the sector use more expensive loans, such as credit cards to track payments. As default rates likely worsen and providers act ahead of tougher regulation, this source of credit could also become harder to access.

Meanwhile, illegal money lending seems to be on the rise. The links between the refusal of regulated credit and the illegal provision are not well followed. But research this year by the Center for Social Justice estimated that more than a million people could borrow from a loan shark, up 700,000 from the last major survey in 2010. More than half of those polled said that they initially considered the loan shark as a friend. .

What hasn’t happened is a really concerted effort by the government to grow the community lending industry, which is limited in capacity and remains tiny with loans of around £34m a year.

Nor is there much evidence of the emergence of a “compliant and responsible high-cost commercial credit industry,” in the words of the regulator, which it says should be able to respond to a part of the growing demand. Amigo, which recently won court approval for its past customer complaint resolution program, is seeking approval to restart lending with a new product that includes the option to reduce the rate paid over time. Other companies are also considering new models.

The question is what contribution they might make in the near future. The gap in the UK credit market will become harder to ignore this winter.

helen.thomas@ft.com
@helentbiz

]]>
Two-fifths of people have borrowed to pay back Buy now, pay later, according to citizens’ advice https://amiyasahu.com/two-fifths-of-people-have-borrowed-to-pay-back-buy-now-pay-later-according-to-citizens-advice/ Wed, 08 Jun 2022 13:51:37 +0000 https://amiyasahu.com/two-fifths-of-people-have-borrowed-to-pay-back-buy-now-pay-later-according-to-citizens-advice/ More than two in five Buy Now Pay Later (BNPL) customers have borrowed money to make repayments, Citizens Advice found. Types of borrowing included overdrafts, borrowing from friends and family, loans, and payday loans. The most popular was credit cards (26%). Young buyers were the most likely to borrow to repay BNPL purchases. The charity […]]]>

More than two in five Buy Now Pay Later (BNPL) customers have borrowed money to make repayments, Citizens Advice found.

Types of borrowing included overdrafts, borrowing from friends and family, loans, and payday loans. The most popular was credit cards (26%).

Young buyers were the most likely to borrow to repay BNPL purchases.

The charity found that 51% of 18-34 year olds had borrowed money to pay off BNPL debt, compared to 39% of 35-54 year olds and 24% of over 55s.

These latest findings come as the BNPL market continues its meteoric growth. But the sector remains unregulated.

Citizens Advice is calling for regulation to protect customers, including market-wide accessibility checks and clearer information at tills.

Worryingly, the charity found that more than 1 in 10 Buy Now Pay Later customers did not fully understand how refunds would be set up.

Millie Harris, debt adviser at Citizens Advice, said:

“Most people I talk to who use Buy Now Pay Later live off overdrafts and credit cards, so they use them for repayments. It’s just leaning on one debt to pay off another debt.

“It’s heartbreaking to see parents who can’t afford to buy clothes or shoes for their children turn to Buy Now, Pay Later thinking it’s doing them a favor. In reality, it’s just more debt and more creditors, on top of what they already face.

“What scares me the most is how easily people can use Buy Now Pay Later. They come to use it much faster than other forms of credit. It’s just a few clicks away Too often that means people don’t realize how serious it is, that it’s a credit and there are consequences if they don’t pay it back.

Dame Clare Moriarty, Managing Director of Citizens Advice, said:

“Buyers are piling up loan after loan and sinking into increasingly desperate situations from which it may seem impossible to escape.

“The spiral of debt from Buy Now Pay Later to credit cards, loans and even payday lenders shows that this is not a risk-free alternative. Buy Now Pay Later is part of the credit industry and urgently needs to be regulated as such.

Did you spot something? You have a story? Send a Facebook message | A direct message to Twitter | Email: News@Deeside.com

]]>
5 Best Online Payday Loans – Online Payday Loans Same Day Deposit & No Rejection Payday Loans Direct Lenders in 2022 https://amiyasahu.com/5-best-online-payday-loans-online-payday-loans-same-day-deposit-no-rejection-payday-loans-direct-lenders-in-2022/ Fri, 03 Jun 2022 06:26:00 +0000 https://amiyasahu.com/5-best-online-payday-loans-online-payday-loans-same-day-deposit-no-rejection-payday-loans-direct-lenders-in-2022/ Online payday loans are the solution to almost any type of financial lock-up. Whether you need money to redecorate the spare bedroom, buy an expensive birthday present, or pay for an expensive car repair, online payday loans can provide you with the cash you need. Many Americans have experienced the financial flexibility offered by online […]]]>
Online payday loans are the solution to almost any type of financial lock-up. Whether you need money to redecorate the spare bedroom, buy an expensive birthday present, or pay for an expensive car repair, online payday loans can provide you with the cash you need. Many Americans have experienced the financial flexibility offered by online payday loans, and if you’re looking for financial relief, you can too.

Loan search services such as Viva Payday Loans give borrowers quick access to lenders offering the best payday loans online. With so many online payday loan providers, it can be difficult to choose the right one. This article features the top five direct online payday loan seekers on the market, putting you in direct contact with lenders.

Best online payday loans 2022 – a quick overview

What are the best online payday loans? See our top 5 below:

  • Viva Payday Loans – Best Payday Loans for Fast Payments
  • Heart Paydays – Best for No Disclaimer Payday Loans, Direct Lenders Only
  • Credit Clock – Best Online Payday Loans With Fast Approval Process
  • Money Lender Squad – Best for $255 payday loans online same day
  • Very Merry Loans – Best online payday loans with same day deposit

Best General Eligibility Criteria for Online Payday Loans

Borrowers must meet the following criteria to obtain payday loans online.

  • Must be 18 years or older
  • Must hold US residency
  • Must earn a minimum of $1,000 per month
  • Must pass accessibility checks
  • Must have a US bank account

If you have bad credit, you can still apply for the best payday loans online through Viva Payday Loans if you meet the criteria above. While none of the loan finder sites do credit checks on your name directly, lenders offering financing might.

Five Best Online Payday Loans: Same Day Deposit for Bad Credit

1. Viva Payday Loans – Best Payday Loans for Fast Payments

Projector wire

Viva Payday Loans is known for its fast turnaround time, providing access to lenders who offer the best payday loans online in the shortest possible time. To be a successful applicant, you must meet the above loan criteria and pass affordability checks. Once the loan is approved, the funds are disbursed to the borrower within an hour. Interest rates range from 5.99% to 35.99%, depending on the lender.

Advantages

  • Repayment terms from 2 to 24 months
  • Loan values ​​up to $5,000
  • Fast payments within 60 minutes of loan approval

The inconvenients

  • High interest rates up to 35.99%

Click here to request funds from Viva Payday Loans >

2. Heart Paydays – Best for No Disclaimer Payday Loans Only for Direct Lenders

700xall-(3)Projector wire

Borrowers with bad FICO scores or no credit history can apply for the best online payday loans for bad credit through the Heart Paydays portal and still stand a chance of getting the money they need if they are currently in an excellent financial situation. When using this loan finder service, borrowers are tempted to be matched with direct no-disclaimer lenders only who are most likely to view their financial situation favorably. Loan amounts range from $100 to $5,000 with APRs of 5.99% to 35.99% and 2 to 24 months to pay off.

Advantages

  • Simple eligibility requirements
  • Almost instantaneous request feedback in 2 minutes
  • Flexible repayment terms

The inconvenients

3. Credit Clock – Best Online Payday Loans for Fast Approval Process

700xall-(1)Projector wire

When the best online payday loans are needed in a hurry, time seems to fly without giving you a second to catch your breath. This is where Credit Clock comes to the rescue with lenders that offer fast approval processes and even faster payments.

Credit Clock connects borrowers and lenders with the click of a button. Lenders through Credit Clock offer borrowers affordable loan amounts from $100 to $5,000 for 2 to 24 months. Interest rates range from 5.99% to 35.99%, which may seem high but may be worth the convenience, fast loan approvals and quick repayments. Check if you meet the loan criteria above and apply today!

Advantages

  • Fast payments
  • The easy online application process
  • Affordable Loans

The inconvenients

  • Interest rate up to 35.99%

4. Money Lender Squad – Best for $255 Same Day Online Payday Loans

700xall-(2)Projector wire

Money Lender Squad gives borrowers direct access to lenders without the usual hassle of traditional financial institutions. Their loan finder service helps borrowers apply for the best direct online payday loans online with a single application.

The process is simple and requires borrowers to enter their details, choose their loan amount and repayment period, and the best payday loans online appear in minutes. Online payday loans through lenders on the Money Lender Squad portal range from $100 to $5,000 with APRs of 5.99% to 35.99% and 2 to 24 months to pay off!

Advantages

  • The fast online application process
  • Offers $255 payday loans online and same day deposit
  • Loan amounts up to $5,000

The inconvenients

  • Not all requests are guaranteed to be approved

5. Very Merry Loans – Best Online Payday Loans with Same Day Deposit

700xall-(5)Projector wire

If you don’t need a large loan, the best online payday loans are available through the Very Merry Loans portal lenders. Loan amounts are kept small to keep them affordable, and APRs typically range from 5.99% to 35.99%. Additionally, lenders on the Very Merry Loans platform are known to pay on the same day as loan approval, giving borrowers access to seemingly instant cash. If you meet the general loan criteria mentioned above, you can easily apply for some of the best payday loans online through lenders on the Very Merry Loans platform.

Advantages

  • Same day payments
  • Flexible loan terms
  • Quick online application in 2 minutes

The inconvenients

  • Loan amounts capped at $2,000

Best Online Payday Loans Same Day Features and Considerations

Credit checks

Most online payday loans through US-based lenders are subject to credit checking by law. No credit check, instant approval. However, if you have a bad FICO score but your financial situation has improved, you can still apply online for the best payday loans.

Affordability

Affordability is key when applying for the best payday loans online. When processing your application, lenders will do an affordability check, such as comparing your bank account to expenses and pay stubs.

Penalties

Your loan agreement will specify the penalties and fees associated with your loans. Therefore, it is best to familiarize yourself with the terms of the loan agreement to avoid paying early or late repayment fees.

Conclusion

Online payday loans are an excellent form of financing for those who need funds quickly. They give you the flexibility you need between now and your next payday if you find yourself in a difficult financial situation.

FAQs

What are the best and easiest payday loans to get same day?

Online payday loans are fast, simple and convenient. First, borrowers complete a simple online application that connects them to a panel of lenders. From there, lenders assess the borrower’s affordability and, if they can afford the loan, funds are usually disbursed the same day.

What is the highest payday loan to get?

Online payday lenders offer loans between $100 and $5,000. Depending on the lender, APRs can range from 5.99% to 35.99% with the providers mentioned above. However, most lenders offer flexible repayment terms of 2-12 months or 2-24 months.

What are the best online payday loans?

Borrowers asking about the best payday loans online can use a range of loan search platforms such as Viva Payday Loans to find the best loan for them. Loan finder services simultaneously connect the borrower to a wide range of lenders. This means they are more likely to get a loan because multiple lenders have assessed their applications.

Disclaimer – The above content is not editorial, and Economic Times hereby disclaims all warranties, express or implied, in connection therewith, and does not necessarily warrant, guarantee or endorse any content. The loan websites reviewed are loan matching services, not direct lenders. Therefore, they are not directly involved in the acceptance of your loan application. Applying for a loan with the websites does not guarantee acceptance of a loan. This article does not provide financial advice. Please seek the assistance of a financial advisor if you need financial assistance. Loans available only to US residents.

]]>
Fintechs increase exposure to gig economy workers as inflation increases demand for loans https://amiyasahu.com/fintechs-increase-exposure-to-gig-economy-workers-as-inflation-increases-demand-for-loans/ Mon, 30 May 2022 18:50:00 +0000 https://amiyasahu.com/fintechs-increase-exposure-to-gig-economy-workers-as-inflation-increases-demand-for-loans/ Fintechs and payday lenders are aggressively lending to gig economy workers even as banks and large non-bank financial corporations (NBFCs) become more conservative in the space. Fintech lenders saw demand for food and grocery delivery managers with various app-based platforms jump up to 40% in Q4FY22, industry executives said. Higher demand, in turn, is fueled […]]]>

Fintechs and payday lenders are aggressively lending to gig economy workers even as banks and large non-bank financial corporations (NBFCs) become more conservative in the space. Fintech lenders saw demand for food and grocery delivery managers with various app-based platforms jump up to 40% in Q4FY22, industry executives said. Higher demand, in turn, is fueled by high inflation, which drives delivery managers to borrow more to bridge cash flow mismatches.

Lenders active in the segment believe demand stems from improving consumer trends as the pandemic recedes. Bhavin Patel, co-founder and CEO of LenDenClub, said that with an increase in consumption, the need for delivery frameworks has grown across industries for various app-based platforms.

Additionally, as the size of the workforce increases, many delivery managers are looking for small loans or payday advances and payday loans to meet their operating expenses. The increase in demand is also due to the targeting of the product to the segment,” Patel said. There isn’t enough data to determine whether a surge in inflation has anything to do with rising demand, according to Patel.

Others, however, take a gloomier view of the situation. They point out that even though the prices of fuel and other essentials have jumped, there has not been a concomitant increase in wages earned by delivery executives. To make matters worse, the increase in 10-minute deliveries has led to an increase in traffic violations and fines paid by delivery officials.

A loan to a delivery executive can be up to 30-40% of their monthly income and terms range from one month to three months. Interest rates vary between 18% and 30%. LenDen Club’s Patel says there is little reason to worry about leverage in the segment, as loans are only approved after reviewing the borrower’s credit bureau data and assessing their ability reimbursement.

Yet concerns about high leverage remain. “The money they’re borrowing now is basically bridge financing. By its very nature, it’s prone to high churn, which means the guy keeps taking out loans from new apps to pay off old ones,” an industry executive said on condition of anonymity. .

Given how precarious the finances of gig workers are, major lenders have recently backed off from financing them. Abhishek Agarwal, co-founder and CEO of CreditVidya, said banks and big NBFCS are getting cautious in the segment. “The risk perception of the segment has increased significantly over the past few months, as the cost of living has increased for them without any concomitant increase in their income. However, some fintechs and payday lenders continue to lend to gig economy workers and the interest rates on these loans are quite high,” Agarwal said.

]]>
Traders accuse council bosses of ‘cheating’ City over £1 market deal https://amiyasahu.com/traders-accuse-council-bosses-of-cheating-city-over-1-market-deal/ Sun, 29 May 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://amiyasahu.com/traders-accuse-council-bosses-of-cheating-city-over-1-market-deal/ Liverpool Council have been accused of ‘misleading the city’ over a deal in which they claimed to have taken control of the city’s markets for £1. In 2016 the council bought Geraud Markets Liverpool Ltd, the company that ran the city’s markets. At the time, the board said it only paid £1 for the company […]]]>

Liverpool Council have been accused of ‘misleading the city’ over a deal in which they claimed to have taken control of the city’s markets for £1.

In 2016 the council bought Geraud Markets Liverpool Ltd, the company that ran the city’s markets. At the time, the board said it only paid £1 for the company which was renamed Liverpool Markets Limited (LML).

Councilor Malcolm Kennedy, then a cabinet member for regeneration, described the deal as a “turning point” for the city. However, it has now emerged that the deal involved the council waiving a significant debt owed to them by Géraud.

READ MORE: ‘Shock’ over multi-million collapse of Liverpool markets company

An LML financial statement published on Companies House explains that £515,073 was written off to enable the purchase of the shares. The board said “legacy” issues around market management will be looked at.

The document, published in December 2018, reads: “Geraud Markets (UK) was the parent company until September 2016. The prior period exceptional charge included in the statement of total comprehensive income includes £515,073 in respect of balances due from Geraud.group which were written off by the company as a condition of the purchase of shares held by Geraud Markets (UK) Limited.”

The report was signed by Darren Hardy, in his capacity as director of LML. Mr. Hardy was also a division manager in the city’s regeneration department at the time.

LML ran well-known markets such as St John’s in the city center and Great Homer Street in Everton. The company went into liquidation in May 2019.

Colin Laphan, chairman of the Liverpool Markets Traders Association, said: “Market traders across Liverpool have been stunned to find that the council has misled people by falsely claiming they have taken over the ‘markets’ for 1 £.

“While they already knew part of the deal was to write off over £500,000 of debt.”

Last week ECHO revealed LML owed the council millions of pounds following its collapse.

Companies House information records that the company was formed in 2003 and Liverpool Council took control of the company in 2016, buying all the shares. The December 2015 accounts showed a deficit of £965,330.

This deficit rose to £2,398,077 in March 2017. Latest figures released earlier this month show LML owes the council £3,469,896.00.

Mr Laphan expressed new concern about how the company had taken on so much debt in recent years.

He said: “Over the past few years, tens of millions have been collected by the marketplaces company, but there is no transparency as to where that money is going. We have been asking for service fee schedules since then. over 15 years.

“This is just one example of the lack of accountability and the hazy conditions around market revenue. Great Homer Street probably generated around £500,000 in revenue a year.

“As traders, we’ve all had one broken promise after another. Those in power seem to have forgotten their basic obligations to the community and need to be held to a higher standard.”

Liverpool Council announced the £1 deal in 2016, when a spokesperson said: “City Council today paid nominal £1 to take over Geraud Markets Liverpool Ltd and will now manage all day-to-day operations of the market with immediate effect.”

Speaking on behalf of the board at the time, Cllr Kennedy, who resigned as an adviser in October 2021 after moving to Spain, said: “This deal is a defining moment in the history of Liverpool markets. and guarantees that they will become a major asset again. in our thriving retail sector.

“As a city council, we are investing millions in upgrading facilities and the time was right to regain full control of operations.

“Thanks to this new agreement, we will be able to host, manage, promote and deliver markets internally and ensure a level of quality worthy of the new facilities in which we are investing.

“This new approach will provide current tenants, future traders and customers with a single point of contact that will allow us to improve the market offer at all farmers’ markets, international markets and Christmas markets.”

Councilor Harry Doyle, Cabinet Member for Visitor Culture and Economy, said: ‘Any legacy issues relating to the management of markets will be reviewed by officers and nothing will be spared.’ That’s why I’ve called for a review to reset our relationship with merchants going forward.”

]]>
Parking meter deal gets even worse for Chicago ratepayers, annual audit says https://amiyasahu.com/parking-meter-deal-gets-even-worse-for-chicago-ratepayers-annual-audit-says/ Fri, 27 May 2022 12:08:38 +0000 https://amiyasahu.com/parking-meter-deal-gets-even-worse-for-chicago-ratepayers-annual-audit-says/ CHICAGO – In their failed bid to blockade Bally’s $1.7 billion River West casino, downtown city council members warned the deal was rushed — just like the one that privatized Chicago’s parking meters — and that it would end up being “even worse” for taxpayers. This dire prediction is hard to imagine, given the results […]]]>

In their failed bid to blockade Bally’s $1.7 billion River West casino, downtown city council members warned the deal was rushed — just like the one that privatized Chicago’s parking meters — and that it would end up being “even worse” for taxpayers.

This dire prediction is hard to imagine, given the results of the latest parking meter audit by accounting giant KPMG.

It shows Chicago’s parking meter revenue is nearly back to pre-pandemic levels. After dropping to $91.6 million in 2020, they jumped to $136.2 million last year.

The increase stems from the recovery of Chicago’s economy and hundreds of new metered spaces in Montrose Harbor and on busy neighborhood streets created as part of Mayor Lori Lightfoot’s 2021 budget.

SUBSCRIBE TO THE FOX 32 YOUTUBE CHANNEL

With 61 years remaining on the 75-year lease, Chicago Parking Meters LLC has now recovered its entire $1.16 billion investment and $502.5 million more.

Private investors as far away as Abu Dhabi would have done even better had they not brought in a new investor and borrowed $22 million at 15% to weather the pandemic. This loan was fully repaid last year.

Additionally, four city-owned underground parking garages brought in $22 million, up 37.5% from $16.2 million last year.

Thanks to higher traffic and a further increase in tolls, the privatized Chicago Skyway generated $114.3 million. This represents a 34.7% increase in revenue and far more than Skyway’s $92 million in annual revenue in 2019, the year before the lockdown closed.

Not a penny of that revenue eased the burden on Chicago taxpayers, who had to absorb a $76.5 million increase in the city’s property tax after a $94 million property tax hike the last year.

Parking meters, downtown garages and the Skyway were all dumped by then-Mayor Richard M. Daley, who used the money to avoid raising property taxes while the pension funds of city ​​employees sank deeper into the hole.

Of these three agreements, the parking meter lease was the biggest political nightmare for the two mayors who inherited it and for the members of Council who approved it with lightning speed.

There have been steep increases in outgoing rates, including parking downtown, from $3 per hour in 2008 to $6.50 per hour in 2013. It is now $7 per hour.

Motorists were so infuriated by the rate hikes that they vandalized and boycotted meters, leading to a dramatic drop in street parking. Revenues eventually recovered — until the pandemic.

The latest audit once again proves how attractive the deal was for private investors.

Although Chicago Parking Meters LLC lost a third of its annual revenue in 2020, the system still generated enough money that year to generate a distribution of $13 million to investors.

Total revenue was well above the $23.8 million in meter payments in 2008, the year before CPM took over the system. Indeed, the mayor and city council, fearful of risking a political backlash by raising parking meter rates themselves, opted to offload the meters instead of directly hiring LAZ Parking to administer a city-owned system with a new technology.

Investors recouped an additional $6.7 million through a contractual provision requiring the city to reimburse investors for each space taken out of service.

This includes temporary street closures for special events, sewer repairs and other construction projects and street closures that have allowed restaurants and bars to serve more customers outdoors when indoor capacity was restricted or even prohibited.

In the full 12 years since the meters were privatized, the city has paid out $78.8 million in “regularization” payments, as they are called.

That’s even after then-Mayor Rahm Emanuel changed the fine print in 2013, reducing the city’s liability by increasing the hours and days motorists pay for parking.

Taking into account the recently announced figure for 2021, private investors have already extracted $2.1 billion from the deal, in part by refinancing three times. The last $1.2 billion refinancing was completed in 2019.

Now that parking revenue is back to normal, the company should end up earning at least six times more than what investors put in over the life of the deal.

The results of the latest audits were provided to the Chicago Sun-Times by attorney Clint Krislov. As director of the Center for Open Government Law Clinic at IIT Chicago-Kent, Krislov has reviewed dozens of transactions and provides an annual analysis of each year’s results.

“These three deals turned out to be like payday loans. They were so myopic. They took the money fast, ignoring the fact that they were burdening the city with terribly structured, undervalued deals that will cost the city for decades to come,” Krislov said Thursday.

“The city should have hired a parking operator to update the technology and operate the system for the city. If they had done that and gotten a better price for the three assets, Chicago today would have between $3 billion and $4 billion. more dollars than she has from those three transactions combined.”

Scott Burnham, a spokesman for Chicago Parking Meters LLC, declined to comment on the audit.

Although the parking meter lease is the deal Council members and their constituents love to hate, Krislov once again argued that it “pales in comparison” to the Skyway deal.

A decade after investors gave the city more than $1.83 billion to lease the Skyway for 99 years, the rights to operate the privatized highway and escalating tolls have been sold to a consortium of three regimes. Canadian pensions for $1 billion more than the original price.

“Canadian pension funds spent $2 billion buying the Skyway and it’s working well. It would have worked well for the city if the city had just hired an operator to run the Skyway,” and collect the growing tolls for the city , Krislov said. .

Krislov tried to have the meter and garage offerings declared illegal on the grounds that the city cannot legally sell on public roads.

He further claimed that the garage deal both limits development in the Loop and subjects the city to giant penalties, such as the $62 million the city spent to compensate the owners of the Millennium Park and Grant garages. Park after the city cleared the Aqua Building, 225 N Columbus Drive, to open a competing garage.

Both lawsuits were dropped after the Emanuel administration defended the deals.

As mayor-elect Lori Lightfoot has promised to take a fresh look at the parking meter deal and try to find a way to break the lease, shorten it or sweeten the sour terms for taxpayers.

She called it a “burr under your saddle” that “keeps rubbing and rubbing,” but her administration did nothing to remove it.

“We know they’re the ones who call when the phone doesn’t ring, as they say,” Krislov joked, paraphrasing a Randy Travis song.

Getting serious, Krislov said he would have been more than happy to team up with mayor to “fight this thing”.

“If the city administration had said, ‘This is not a legal agreement. The city cannot agree to sell the right of way to individuals in this type of agreement, “we might have managed to get the city out of it,” he added. said.

]]>