Financial Measure – Amiya Sahu http://amiyasahu.com/ Sun, 20 Nov 2022 07:12:36 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://amiyasahu.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-150x150.png Financial Measure – Amiya Sahu http://amiyasahu.com/ 32 32 COP27 – Credibility issues around Global Shield – World https://amiyasahu.com/cop27-credibility-issues-around-global-shield-world/ Sun, 20 Nov 2022 05:46:29 +0000 https://amiyasahu.com/cop27-credibility-issues-around-global-shield-world/ The 27th United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP27) in Sharm-el-Sheikh, Egypt, is expected to conclude this weekend. Michael Kühn from Welthungerhilfe is present and reports on the developments. Climate-related risks have pushed both risk provision expenditures and debt to high levels in many countries particularly affected by the effects of climate change. Increasing and securing […]]]>

The 27th United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP27) in Sharm-el-Sheikh, Egypt, is expected to conclude this weekend. Michael Kühn from Welthungerhilfe is present and reports on the developments.

Climate-related risks have pushed both risk provision expenditures and debt to high levels in many countries particularly affected by the effects of climate change. Increasing and securing funding in advance so that it is disbursed quickly and reliably before or immediately after disasters can reduce the impact of those disasters. This ensures increased resilience of people living in countries exposed to climate risks, promotes sustainable development and thus protects the lives and livelihoods of poor and vulnerable people.

Global Shield: The possibility of fair compensation for climate loss and damage?

Partly initiated by Germany, the G7 and more recently the Vulnerable Twenty (V20) group have now agreed to establish a Global Shield funding mechanism to help address loss and damage. The Global Shield is not the only measure needed to address loss and damage – but it should aim to make meaningful and effective progress in providing and facilitating greater and better pre-established protection against climate-related risks and to disasters, for example by making money available for protection measures at an early stage.

Mobilizing new funding is crucial to the success of the initiative, as evidenced by the V20’s interest in the Global Shield. But it is also the target of criticism from civil society.

The credibility of the Global North is seriously damaged by empty promises

While the previous promise of industrialized countries to provide 100 billion dollars a year in climate finance from 2020 has not yet been fulfilled, representatives of the South are struggling to rally behind the idea of ​​a new financial facility whose funds must be provided. The credibility of the Global North has been lost. In addition, some fear that the Global Shield will replace a loss and damage financing facility, which industrialized countries have been reluctant to act on. The criticism is that the new mechanism is limited in scope and reach and therefore risks delaying the establishment of a real facility. In other words, it reduces the chances of obtaining binding commitments from governments or international organizations to provide financial aid or loans in specific cases.

30 years later: recognition of climate damage in Vanuatu

Discussions on a financial mechanism to deal with loss and damage date back to a 1991 request by Vanuatu on behalf of the Alliance of Small Island States, which proposed an insurance pool funded by industrialized countries to cover the financial burden and provide compensation. For the first time in 30 years, industrialized nations have now recognized that such loss and damage exists and therefore can no longer be ignored. It is a welcome step forward for the negotiations that the issue is on the agenda of COP27.

Time is running out: a decision at COP27 could restore credibility

The discussion on how to set up a loss and damage financing facility is expected to take place within the next two years. But the countries on the front lines of climate change cannot and will not wait that long; they are already dealing with the damage today. Now would be a good time to decide that here in Sharm el Sheikh. This would allow rich countries to regain lost credibility beyond the Global Shield initiative.

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Improving public data on car credit https://amiyasahu.com/improving-public-data-on-car-credit/ Thu, 17 Nov 2022 18:08:30 +0000 https://amiyasahu.com/improving-public-data-on-car-credit/ Since the start of the pandemic, the cost of automobiles has increased dramatically. More than 100 million Americans have a car loan, and the CFPB estimates that there is currently $1.5 trillion in car loans outstanding, making it the third largest category of consumer credit after loans. mortgages and student loans. On its current trajectory, […]]]>

Since the start of the pandemic, the cost of automobiles has increased dramatically. More than 100 million Americans have a car loan, and the CFPB estimates that there is currently $1.5 trillion in car loans outstanding, making it the third largest category of consumer credit after loans. mortgages and student loans. On its current trajectory, auto loan balances will exceed outstanding student loans in the first half of 2023.

Financial markets and policymakers have long had access to granular mortgage data that has provided insight into lending and risk patterns. Since student loans are largely administered by the federal government, we also know more about them. But, despite its size, much less is known about the auto loan market. Accordingly, the CFPB announces a collaborative effort with industry and other agencies to develop a new dataset to better monitor the auto loan market.

The evolution of the car loan market

Automobile credit accounts for approximately one-third of non-mortgage consumer debt and the amount of outstanding loans has double over the past 10 years. More recently, the automotive market has undergone substantial and rapid changes. Over the past two years, car prices have risen dramatically, leading to larger loan amounts and higher monthly payments. These increases in the amount of loans are beginning to have an impact on consumers and households. Recent data shows an increase in delinquencies on auto loans, especially for low-income consumers and those with subprime credit ratings. We also see evidence that some consumers may be excluded from the current market.

Although the data currently available allows market participants to identify and measure certain trends, it is not granular or comprehensive enough to fully explore the cause of these trends. Additionally, rapid industry changes over the past few years have made visibility into market trends increasingly difficult.

Data gaps

Compared to mortgages, credit cards, and student loans, data available to market participants, investors, and regulators in the auto loan market is relatively sparse. Trade data is often highly aggregated, which limits the ability of market participants to perform their own independent summaries and analyses. For example, publicly available repossession data is based on proprietary estimates and does not provide a level of granularity for further analysis.

Similarly, the CFPB Consumer Credit Panel, which is a 1 in 48 sample of consumer credit report data from one of three national consumer reporting agencies, can address some of the shortcomings. However, many auto loans are made to consumers with deep subprime or subprime credit scores from lenders who do not provide data on these loans to credit reporting agencies.

Without this holistic view, market participants are unable to identify emerging risks and opportunities as they arise. This could lead to negative consequences for consumers, lenders and investors. For example, lack of visibility into the mortgage market was a key issue that led to the Great Recession of 2008. In response, federal regulators took steps to expand and combine mortgage data sets to better inform the public, market players and regulators. . A better understanding of the underlying data can also support a more competitive automotive market. With greater visibility into market trends, lenders and investors can spot emerging opportunities, improve risk management practices, and ultimately expand access to credit (including refinancing).

Collect data to create a new dataset

The CFPB seeks to build a new set of data that will enable a more robust understanding of market trends. This may include, for example, collecting retrospective data from a sample of lenders who represent a representative sample of the auto loan market.

Before doing this, we will bring stakeholders together to gather feedback on our current data landscape. We are too solicit public opinion . Submissions will be accepted through December 19, 2022. You may submit responsive information and other comments, identified by File No. CFPB-2022-0075 by any of the following methods:

  1. Federal Electronic Rulemaking Portal : Follow the instructions for submitting comments.
  2. Email: AutoLendingDataGaps@cfpb.gov. Include case number CFPB-2022-0075 in the subject line of the message.
  3. Mail/Hand Delivery/Courier: Receiving Feedback: Auto Loan Data Gaps, Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, 1700 G Street NW, Washington, DC 20552.

Guidelines: The CFPB encourages prompt submission of comments. All submissions must include the document title and file number. In general, all comments received will be posted unchanged on https://www.regulations.gov .

All submissions, including attachments and other supporting documents, will become part of the public record and subject to public disclosure. Proprietary information or sensitive personal information, such as account numbers or social security numbers, or the names of other people, should not be included. Submissions will not be edited to remove any identifying or contact information.

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How to measure innovation [5 Steps] https://amiyasahu.com/how-to-measure-innovation-5-steps/ Thu, 10 Nov 2022 16:33:07 +0000 https://amiyasahu.com/how-to-measure-innovation-5-steps/ How to measure innovation [5 Steps]BY BRUCE FISCHER | 6 MIN READ Most people imagine that creativity is accidental – a light bulb lit above the head of a cartoon character. Sure, that may be true, but how does an organization create conditions where light bulbs regularly light up over employees’ heads? The measurement of innovation is necessary to achieve […]]]> How to measure innovation [5 Steps]

BY BRUCE FISCHER | 6 MIN READ

Most people imagine that creativity is accidental – a light bulb lit above the head of a cartoon character. Sure, that may be true, but how does an organization create conditions where light bulbs regularly light up over employees’ heads?

The measurement of innovation is necessary to achieve an optimal rate of innovation in an organization.

There is a saying, attributed to Peter Drucker, that “if you can’t measure something, you can’t manage it”. This adage certainly applies to innovation. Innovation is often a fleeting process that defies quantification. But that’s one more reason to measure it. By effectively monitoring the innovation process, we can clearly see who or what is influencing innovation and take action to increase it.

The big question is: how? How do we document the ideation process and give proper credit to creators? How do you quantify ideas regarding their potential costs and benefits to know if they are worth implementing?

Most organizations count their patents, and that’s certainly a useful measure of innovation. (The value of individual patents varies widely, so it’s important to include an estimate of the dollar value of each patent.)

But what about the measurement of different types of non-patentable innovations? The organization should measure all ideas generated to assess the innovation effectiveness of each employee, as well as the innovation rate of the organization as a whole.

5 steps to measure innovation

Essentially, to know how well an organization innovates, we need to measure both parts of the innovation process: ideation and implementation.

  1. Collect and track every idea
  2. Estimate the costs and benefits of each idea
  3. Measure the implementation of each idea
  4. Calculate the added value of each idea
  5. Determine the rate of innovation across the organization

Step 1: Collect and track each idea

  • People must submit their ideas digitally via email. There will be a record of who submitted each idea and when.
  • An idea review committee should be formed and a chair should categorize each idea and respond to the proposer(s) with a status report. It is important to react quickly and provide periodic updates.
  • The idea review committee should meet regularly to review ideas. Ideas should be ranked by size and potential for success. It is necessary to maintain a sense of urgency to move ideas through the necessary stages of testing, economic evaluation and implementation. Innovators are discouraged when the organization lags behind in the steps of the “innovation supply chain”. Keeping idea authors up to date on the status of their submissions is essential.

Step 2: Estimate the costs and benefits of each idea

It is important to do a “rough” cost-benefit analysis on a new idea as soon as possible. This will identify the main financial barriers to the idea and determine if the idea is financially viable. If it is a small project, with less than $100,000 in potential profits, a simple payback period analysis will suffice. This should show a payback of three years or less. For larger ideas, a discounted cash flow analysis should be performed using initial costs, recurring costs, and expected revenue stream. Of course, risk is an important factor that should always be considered when evaluating ideas.

Step 3: Measure the implementation of each idea

Once an idea is approved and passes the necessary tests of technical feasibility and financial viability, it is ready for implementation; and it becomes a project. The measurement of project implementation is well established in the practice of project management. The planning stage of a project should involve detailed estimates of its time, cost and scope. Execution must be monitored, which implies a detailed division of tasks and responsibilities. When a project is completed, an analysis of the problems encountered must be made. The difference between the estimated and actual costs and benefits of the project must be calculated.

Step 4: Calculate the added value of each idea

As mentioned above, when an idea is approved for implementation, it must include an estimate of its potential value based on the cost-benefit analysis in Step 2. Note that some ideas, such as ideas security or customer service, may not have an obvious effect. dollar benefits. The organization must estimate the value of these ideas even if they are based on subjective assessments. This can be called the estimated value of the idea until it is implemented.

Next, the real value of the idea must be determined. When the calculation of the implemented idea value is performed, the difference between the estimated value of an idea and its actual implemented value will provide the organization with useful information.

Step 5: Determine the rate of innovation across the organization

An idea measurement system is an indispensable part of innovation management. First, it provides a measure of each employee’s ideation rate. Then the predicted ideation rate for departments, divisions and an entire organization can be easily calculated.

This information will provide an advanced indication of the actual innovation rate of the organization: the sum of all ideas submitted over time.

As ideas move into implementation, they need to be tracked until they become completed innovations. Idea implementation rate provides another key metric that will help manage idea execution.

Why organizations should have an innovation measurement system

Some organizations have strategies that drive them to be innovation leaders and others choose to be followers. But it’s hard to know if you’re a leader if you don’t know when or how much you’re actually innovating.

Reliably measuring the ideation and implementation of new ideas puts an organization on solid ground. Without such systems in place, organizations are likely to select people for pay raises and promotions based on more subjective measures such as political behavior rather than results.

Meanwhile, rewarding people who come up with new ideas creates a powerful incentive to innovate more. Not surprisingly, once an idea measurement system is in place and employees are aware that it will influence their pay raises and promotions, many employees will respond by making a greater creative effort.

The future belongs to innovation. Organizations need to take a systematic approach to innovation, and measurement is a key aspect of this effort. It identifies opportunities and tracks the organization’s efforts to increase innovation. Most importantly, measurement provides the means for an equitable distribution of recognition and rewards for innovation and establishes the organization’s value for innovation.

Make innovation your life’s work

At Elmhurst University, you can develop your inner entrepreneur in our Graduate Certificate Program in Innovation and Entrepreneurship.

Our program emphasizes hands-on learning and includes business mentorship, a startup incubator/accelerator, entrepreneur-in-residence, and other innovation support. Fill out the form below to find out more today!

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Belvedere tax Measure D a fair proposition to stabilize roads – Marin Independent Journal https://amiyasahu.com/belvedere-tax-measure-d-a-fair-proposition-to-stabilize-roads-marin-independent-journal/ Wed, 26 Oct 2022 22:31:12 +0000 https://amiyasahu.com/belvedere-tax-measure-d-a-fair-proposition-to-stabilize-roads-marin-independent-journal/ The proposed Measure D levy to raise money for disaster preparedness in Belvedere is either a fair way to pay for needed repairs – or it’s a slush fund mess pushed by a city council trying to bend the rules and deceive community owners. It depends who you ask. Accountable Belvedere, a group of concerned […]]]>

The proposed Measure D levy to raise money for disaster preparedness in Belvedere is either a fair way to pay for needed repairs – or it’s a slush fund mess pushed by a city council trying to bend the rules and deceive community owners.

It depends who you ask.

Accountable Belvedere, a group of concerned residents, wants to derail the proposed 0.8% property transfer tax that will force Belvedere to become Marin County’s second charter city (after San Rafael). The group says the tax “will lessen City Hall’s liability while unnecessarily and unfairly raising taxes and giving City Hall a blank check.”

City officials say about $20 million is needed to finally address a long-running report questioning the soundness of San Rafael Avenue and Beach Road, the main roads into and out of the Belvedere. Studies show that roads, built on fill, are prone to liquefaction in the event of a major earthquake.

City plans will reinforce these roads. Plans include other projects to improve public safety. The tax is expected to provide $1.6 million annually to the city’s general fund and be levied for 30 years or less with audits and civilian oversight. It is a general tax and requires a simple majority to pass. Officials say the city’s track record of prudent spending and its fiscal position should allay fears.

“This is a city with minimal debt and a healthy reserve,” said Mayor Sally Wilkinson, who worked with a finance committee of volunteer experts to put Measure D on the ballot. “The city will be very transparent with the oversight and finance committees.”

The state-subsidized inspection that led to the troubling diagnosis of the roads took place more than 10 years ago. City council members say they’re just trying to fix them and pay them in the best way possible.

The tax proposal divided the community. Measure D is endorsed by a group of 18 former mayors of Belvedere. In a letter to the community, the former mayors highlighted the benefits, including the ability to fully deduct the cost for capital gains purposes.

City leaders cited research showing property transfer taxes are fairer to a larger group of community residents. The studies are compelling. Unlike a parcel tax or sales tax, it does not immediately increase the cost of living at Belvedere.

But the Marin Coalition of Sensible Taxpayers and the Marin Association of Realtors suggest voting no. COST believes the levy’s long 30-year duration, along with the potential for it to be used for other projects, makes it a non-starter.

“The city has no desire to go into debt,” Wilkinson retorts. “But if we collect enough in the first few years, we can ask for the tax to be removed sooner.”

The Accountable Belvedere group points to elderly homeowners who could move from a Belvedere home on the hilly island to one in the flat areas of the Lagoon District. This resident could be forced to pay the tax twice (sale and purchase).

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New Zealand has a wellness budget and the man behind it says it proves budgets aren’t just about finances https://amiyasahu.com/new-zealand-has-a-wellness-budget-and-the-man-behind-it-says-it-proves-budgets-arent-just-about-finances/ Sat, 22 Oct 2022 19:10:27 +0000 https://amiyasahu.com/new-zealand-has-a-wellness-budget-and-the-man-behind-it-says-it-proves-budgets-arent-just-about-finances/ When Grant Robertson meets his counterparts at world events, he is regularly asked about wellness. Not his own welfare, but the welfare of his whole country. “I suspect it’s in the talking points,” he laughs. “There is a real interest in that. Mr. Robertson is Deputy Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern and New Zealand’s Finance Minister. […]]]>

When Grant Robertson meets his counterparts at world events, he is regularly asked about wellness.

Not his own welfare, but the welfare of his whole country.

“I suspect it’s in the talking points,” he laughs.

“There is a real interest in that.

Mr. Robertson is Deputy Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern and New Zealand’s Finance Minister.

Among economists and those who study public policy, he is known for presenting a “well-being” budget in 2019, declaring that the success of the economy under his leadership would be measured by more than traditional indicators like productivity and the growth.

This approach is based on a simple idea: a country’s financial prosperity alone is not a sufficiently accurate measure of the quality of life of its citizens.

“Traditionally, budgets have primarily looked at the financial results of decisions made by governments and they are extremely important,” he told the ABC.

“But it’s not the alpha and omega.”

New Zealand Finance Minister Grant Robertson with Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern.(AP: Rosa Woods via pool)

Its well-being budget has been drawn up with reference to around sixty standard of living indicators and the government has five “well-being objectives”.

They include commitments to reduce child poverty, help workers transition to a low-emission economy, improve the physical and mental health of New Zealanders and improve outcomes for Maori.

Mr Robertson says the aim is to ‘provide a much richer picture of what success really is’ and make a budget more relevant to New Zealanders.

“There are a lot of numbers and charts and definitions and acronyms that come with money management, and they don’t always mean a lot to people,” he said.

“But I think [the wellbeing concept] makes it more real.”

“If we don’t have a population that feels good, healthy and happy, they will be less productive.”

How far has New Zealand’s approach gone?

But it is not yet known how much of an overall difference the “well-being” budget approach has made.

Some measures don’t seem to have budged much, while others seem to have gotten worse, although the COVID-19 pandemic certainly hasn’t helped matters.

“I think the way it was rolled out was a bit of a marketing gimmick,” said Arthur Grimes, the former chairman of the Reserve Bank of New Zealand.

“I’m a big fan of well-being metrics, but you need explicit targets. We haven’t done that, so what’s been achieved and what hasn’t been achieved in a lot of areas isn’t is not entirely clear.”

“The approach to wellbeing in New Zealand is quite vague. For that to work, I think you need better goals.”

The deputy prime minister says he disagrees with some of the criticism his government has faced and says progress on tough goals will simply take a long time to achieve.

“We have lifted around 66,000 children out of poverty over the past few years, so we can say yes, this measure is something we have achieved,” Robertson added.

“Likewise, the world can step in and COVID came along and it disrupted a lot of what we wanted to do.”

Measuring well-being is not a new idea

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Play the video.  Duration: 6 minutes 34 seconds

Jim Chalmers promised a ‘wellness’ budget – what will it look like?

The idea of ​​measuring the link between well-being and government spending is neither new nor unique to New Zealand, although the country grabbed headlines in 2019.

The concept has been discussed and tried out in various ways, including places like Scotland and Wales.

Australia’s Treasury developed its own wellbeing framework in 2004 – although it was scrapped in 2016 – former UK Prime Minister David Cameron spoke about the approach when in office, as did the former French President Nicolas Sarkozy.

“Australia was arguably a world leader in this,” Grimes said.

“Every budget since at least 1900 has focused on well-being. Governments spend huge amounts on things like health, education, and well-being. Well-being is just synonymous with well-being. “

Proponents of a specific approach to well-being in government policy argue that it can provide a more targeted way to address long-term problems in a society and ultimately be good for budgets to come. long term.

For example, if children are lifted out of poverty and have access to a good education, it is assumed that they will contribute more to the economy through work, innovation and taxes later in life.

“This approach is an opportunity,” said Professor Michael Mintrom of Monash University.

“He treats policies as investments.”

“In terms of the wellbeing of the nation as a whole, a focus on early intervention is absolutely critical.”

However, opponents argue that economic indicators, particularly inflation, growth and unemployment, will remain the primary determinants of societal well-being, especially as the global economy faces choppy waters and the cost of living is skyrocketing.

Tuesday’s Australian budget will feature a welfare chapter

Australia’s new treasurer, Jim Chalmers, has had an interest in wellbeing budgeting for some time.

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In first test, St. Paul housing rent control has limited impact https://amiyasahu.com/in-first-test-st-paul-housing-rent-control-has-limited-impact/ Thu, 20 Oct 2022 18:18:00 +0000 https://amiyasahu.com/in-first-test-st-paul-housing-rent-control-has-limited-impact/ St. Paul’s City Council fended off challenges from raising rents above a three percent limit set by voters last fall, allowing increases to more than double go forward. In Wednesday’s 6-0 decision (council chairwoman Amy Brendmoen was absent), council upheld an administrative finding that an 8% rent increase was warranted for a tenant in Union […]]]>

St. Paul’s City Council fended off challenges from raising rents above a three percent limit set by voters last fall, allowing increases to more than double go forward.

In Wednesday’s 6-0 decision (council chairwoman Amy Brendmoen was absent), council upheld an administrative finding that an 8% rent increase was warranted for a tenant in Union Flats, a building in Midway district belonging to the developer Dominium.

The council also upheld an administrative finding allowing a 6.1% increase — reducing a proposed 8% hike — for a tenant at Dominium’s Cambric Senior Apartments, near the Metro State University campus on the city’s east side.

Cambric tenant Katherine Banbury called it a small victory as she addressed City Council on Wednesday.

“Having used the rent stabilization appeals process, I am heartened that tenants like me have legal recourse, and I am all the more determined to make the process stronger and more accessible to all tenants,” she said.

Dominium said Thursday it would respect the council’s decision for other tenants in that building.

Before you continue reading, take a moment to donate to MPR News. Your financial support ensures that factual and reliable information and context remain accessible to all.

The two appellants still ended up paying double the cap proposed in the ballot voted last year.

That’s because the city has included a series of exemptions, accounting for inflation, landlords’ return on investment, capital improvements and other financial factors that allow landlords to increase rents by more. 3% per year.

The city’s process also allows landlords to “self-certify” the need for rent increases of up to 8% and file formal requests with the city for rent increases of 8-12%.

The two St. Paul tenants who appealed, represented by the Housing Justice Center, did so against “self-certified” increases imposed by Dominium.

The company has a wide range of accommodation in the Twin Cities, many of which benefit from tax subsidies to keep them affordable. Dominium argued in administrative hearings that its grants and development agreements had built-in rent escalation controls and that city contracts replaced the rent control ordinance.

The city did not address the issue, but said the rent control process in place allowed for the increases.

The administrative recommendation, and council’s ratification in both cases, sets a key precedent for the fate of the rent control measure, establishing broad power for landlords to raise rents.

This is in addition to the exemption for new housing, retroactive to decades, that the city added to the rent control ordinance in recent weeks. The city will also allow landlords to raise rents for vacant units by up to eight percent plus inflation.

Rent control advocates like St. Paul City Council member Mitra Jalali have taken the reduction in the Cambric case as a sign that at least some control can be imposed.

“These increases have been analyzed; they have been audited. And at the end of the day, we see a lower increase than it would be in a pure, unregulated situation,” Jalali said. “I think this self-certification process is problematic at times, allowing for a reasonable rate of return. people. And I think we see that in the way it plays out.

It may also have even broader implications, as Minneapolis is still figuring out how to define and implement a rent control measure that voters also approved last year.

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More voters support trash measure than oppose it, poll finds https://amiyasahu.com/more-voters-support-trash-measure-than-oppose-it-poll-finds/ Tue, 18 Oct 2022 02:02:00 +0000 https://amiyasahu.com/more-voters-support-trash-measure-than-oppose-it-poll-finds/ A new poll shows more San Diegans supporting a ballot measure to repeal free trash pickup for single-family homes than opposing it, but support drops sharply when people are told the measure could mean paying new costs. Support for Measure B outpaced opposition by 35% to 21% before likely voters were told of the potential […]]]>

A new poll shows more San Diegans supporting a ballot measure to repeal free trash pickup for single-family homes than opposing it, but support drops sharply when people are told the measure could mean paying new costs.

Support for Measure B outpaced opposition by 35% to 21% before likely voters were told of the potential fee in the poll, which was conducted by SurveyUSA for the San Diego Union-Tribune and 10News. But an even larger share of likely voters – 41% – said they were undecided.

After respondents were told the measure could result in monthly bills of between $23 and $29 for single-family homeowners, 45% of likely voters said they were less likely than before to support the measure, and 27% said they were more likely to support it.

These results suggest that measure B could be vulnerable to a strong opposition campaign ahead of the November 8 elections.

The language of the ballot measure, which critics have called misleading, does not mention fees. He asks if the city should be able to recoup the cost of waste and recycling so that everyone in the city can get a comparable service.

San Diego is the only major city in the nation with a two-tier waste collection system that offers free pickup to single-family homes, but requires apartment and condo residents, as well as businesses, to pay fees. private carriers.

Measure B receives strong support from those who want the city to prioritize climate change, people who describe themselves as very liberal, young people and those who are least sure about voting, according to the poll.

A key argument in favor of measure B is that it would allow the city to stimulate recycling with financial incentives to produce less waste. Such incentives are not possible when the service is free.

The measure, which only requires a simple majority to pass, was most strongly opposed by those who want to prioritize road repairs, Tories, older people and those most likely to vote.

The poll polled 649 registered voters Sunday through Thursday on landlines, smartphones, tablets and other electronic devices and has a margin of error of 5.4 percentage points. The poll deemed 549 respondents likely to vote.

Support from single-family homeowners fell after mention of new fees for these residents, while support from condo owners increased.

The measure initially received support from 37% of single-family homeowners, but 55% of single-family homeowners said the potential fees made them less likely to support it. Only 21% said fees made them more likely to support Measure B.

Among condo owners, initial support was 33%. When told about the potential fees for single-family homeowners, 34% of condo owners said they were more likely to support Measure B, while 29% said they were less likely.

The measure is expected to get strong support from condo owners and people living in apartments, as they wouldn’t face new fees, but the city would receive about $70 million a year in new payroll funds. , services and amenities.

A possible reason to doubt the adoption of the measure is that people do not appreciate garbage collection. When asked how much they would be willing to pay monthly for garbage service, 28% said nothing, 27% said less than $10, 25% said $10 to $20, and 10% said over $20.

Another possible concern for the measure’s outlook could be strong opposition among highly likely voters and strong support among less likely voters.

Among respondents who had previously voted by post, opposition outstripped support by 45% to 38%.

Among those who said they were certain to vote, support outpaced opposition by 35% to 21%. Those who described themselves as likely voters supported the measure by the widest margin, 35% to 16%.

Of those who said they were certain to vote, 42% said they were undecided. Among likely voters, 50% say they are undecided.

Support for the measure varied by race. Before charges were mentioned, support outnumbered opposition by 40% to 12% among Asian Americans, 38% to 25% among Hispanics, and 33% to 22% among whites.

The mention of fees made all three groups much more likely to oppose the measure. Results from black voters were not included in the results because they did not represent a large enough share of those polled.

Income level does not appear to be a key factor in favor of the measure. Support outpaced opposition by 34% to 26% among those earning less than $40,000 a year, 35% to 21% among those earning between $40,000 and $80,000, and 35% to 19% among those earning more than $80,000.

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‘Headwinds are pretty strong’: Democrats’ midterm hopes crumble https://amiyasahu.com/headwinds-are-pretty-strong-democrats-midterm-hopes-crumble/ Sat, 15 Oct 2022 04:00:28 +0000 https://amiyasahu.com/headwinds-are-pretty-strong-democrats-midterm-hopes-crumble/ During a brief window this summer, the prospects for Democrats in the midterm elections were brightening. A string of Republican candidates faltered in the polls, gas prices fell and the Supreme Court’s decision to overturn Roe vs. Wade galvanized support for abortion rights. But with just under a month to go until the crucial vote, […]]]>

During a brief window this summer, the prospects for Democrats in the midterm elections were brightening. A string of Republican candidates faltered in the polls, gas prices fell and the Supreme Court’s decision to overturn Roe vs. Wade galvanized support for abortion rights.

But with just under a month to go until the crucial vote, there are growing signs that Democratic momentum has stalled, giving Republicans a slight edge as they seek to regain control of the House of Representatives and Senate.

The latest inflation figures, released on Thursday, showed that the consumer price index’s core inflation measure rose 6.6% on an annual basis last month, its fastest pace fast in four decades – allowing Republicans to continue to hammer Democrats over their handling of the economy as Election Day approaches on Nov. 8.

At the same time, opinion polls showed declining support for Democratic Senate candidates in several crucial battleground states.

“The two bedrooms [of Congress] are still in play. . but the headwinds are pretty strong,” said Matt Bennett, co-founder of the Democratic think tank Third Way.

An important test for Democrats is the race for the Pennsylvania Senate, where brash, hoodie-clad Lt. Governor John Fetterman had built up a double-digit lead in the polls over the summer with a campaign of meme-heavy social media, despite having a stroke. which has largely kept him out of the campaign trail.

However, RealClearPolitics’ average now shows the Democrat ahead of his opponent, former Republican TV personality Mehmet Oz, by just 3.7 points in the margin of error, following a relentless ad campaign by ‘Oz accusing the Democrat of being “soft on crime”.

Concerns about Fetterman’s health were reignited this week by an NBC interview in which he used closed captions to help him understand the reporter’s questions.

In Wisconsin, meanwhile, polls conducted earlier this summer showed Democratic challenger Mandela Barnes with a healthy lead over Republican incumbent Ron Johnson. However, the latest investigations in the Midwestern state show Johnson – who has also accused his opponent of being soft on crime – edging out Barnes as Election Day approaches.

A Marquette University Law School survey released this week found that 52% of likely voters in Wisconsin said they support Johnson, compared to 46% for Barnes. Just two months ago, the same poll gave Barnes a seven-point lead.

Charles Franklin, who leads the Marquette poll, said “almost all” of the change could be attributed to independents lining up behind the Republican – a trend that could be mirrored in other races across the country as a small segment of undecided voters make up their minds by election day.

Democrats and Republicans agree that Senate control will likely come down to a handful of swing states, including not just Pennsylvania and Wisconsin, but also Georgia – where incumbent Democrat Raphael Warnock remains neck and neck in the polls with scandals Republican challenger Herschel Walker – and Nevada, where Catherine Cortez-Masto, the Democratic senator, has consistently trailed Republican challenger Adam Laxalt.

Midterm elections have historically served as a referendum on the incumbent White House and have won victories for the ruling party. Joe Biden’s approval ratings have risen in recent months, but only 42.6% of Americans say they approve of the president’s job, according to an average of FiveThirtyEight polls.

Several polls show lower levels of support when voters were asked how they rated the president’s handling of the economy in particular. As inflation continues to bite, analysts warn it could hurt Democrats in the final stretch of the campaign.

“If gas prices go up and inflation is more noticeable, that’s positive for Republicans and negative for Democrats,” said Kyle Kondik of the nonpartisan Center for Politics at the University of Virginia. “Democrats want the election to focus on other things.”

Democratic House and Senate candidates have anchored their campaigns on abortion, criticizing Republican efforts to restrict access to the procedure and promising to enshrine abortion rights in law if they are able. to form a sufficiently large majority in Congress. But in recent days, Democrats from all ideological backgrounds have publicly questioned whether the issue will be enough to secure Election Day victories.

Bernie Sanders, the progressive senator, this week urged fellow Democrats to avoid making abortion rights their “final argument” to voters.

“In my view, while the issue of abortion needs to remain front and center, it would be a political mistake for Democrats to ignore the state of the economy and let the lies and distortions unanswered Republicans,” Sanders wrote in an op-ed for The Guardian.

His comments were echoed by James Carville, the centrist Democratic strategist, who said: “A lot of these consultants think that if all we do is abort [advertising] spots that are going to win for us. I do not think so.

“It’s a good number,” Carville told The Associated Press. “But if you sit there and they hammer you on crime and the cost of living, you have to be more aggressive than just yelling abortion every two words.”

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Pa. Election 2022: Where Mastriano and Shapiro Stand on College Funding, Transparency and Debt Cancellation | News, Sports, Jobs https://amiyasahu.com/pa-election-2022-where-mastriano-and-shapiro-stand-on-college-funding-transparency-and-debt-cancellation-news-sports-jobs/ Thu, 13 Oct 2022 05:29:22 +0000 https://amiyasahu.com/pa-election-2022-where-mastriano-and-shapiro-stand-on-college-funding-transparency-and-debt-cancellation-news-sports-jobs/ HARRISBURG — The governor of Pennsylvania has broad authority to offer education funding, serve on college boards and appoint trustees to these critical panels. Democratic Gov. Tom Wolf, for example, sent $40 million in unused stimulus funds to four universities this summer, a move he could make without input from the General Assembly. […]]]>

HARRISBURG — The governor of Pennsylvania has broad authority to offer education funding, serve on college boards and appoint trustees to these critical panels.

Democratic Gov. Tom Wolf, for example, sent $40 million in unused stimulus funds to four universities this summer, a move he could make without input from the General Assembly.

In November, voters will choose a new governor — with the two favorites for the seat being Democrat Josh Shapiro, the state’s attorney general, and Republican Doug Mastriano, a senator representing Franklin County.

To see how the top two candidates differ on issues related to higher education in Pennsylvania, Spotlight PA asked each campaign for information and reviewed previous political statements, votes or positions. Shapiro’s campaign responded with information. Mastriano’s campaign failed to respond.

Here is where the two candidates stand:

Vision for Pennsylvania Colleges

and universities

The Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education, or PASSHE, is made up of 14 universities and educates more than 93,000 students. The governor, with the approval of the state Senate, appoints 11 of the 20 members of the state system’s board of trustees, who have the power to appoint college presidents, set tuition fees, and oversee other financial decisions.

The governor and the person they select to be the state’s education secretary also sit on the board. Both roles can choose people designated as replacements.

In 2016, PASSHE began a redesign to reduce costs and promote financial stability and access. In October 2021, the system requested an additional $73 million from the state, for a total of $550 million.

As a state senator, Mastriano voted to send nearly $552.5 million to the state system this summer. His campaign website makes no mention of his plans for the state system.

In a statement to Spotlight PA, Shapiro’s campaign said it plans to increase investments in PASSHE schools and work to make community college more affordable.

“As governor, Josh will champion legislation that lowers costs, increases access to community colleges and state-linked universities, and funds resources that allow more low-income students to participate in the economy. “, the campaign wrote. “He will invest more in PASSHE schools, make community college more affordable, and ensure that all of our students have many opportunities to succeed.”

The Association of Pennsylvania State College and University Faculties, the union representing faculty and coaches at PASSHE schools, has endorsed Shapiro for the governorship.

State credits for state-linked universities

The state also allocates funds to Pennsylvania’s four state-related universities – Pennsylvania State University, University of Pittsburgh, Lincoln University, and Temple University. State-linked schools have less state oversight and are more autonomous than schools in the PASSHE system.

The governor sits on each of the state-related boards of directors and also appoints other directors to serve.

In July, Mastriano was among seven senators who voted against funding state-linked universities. State House Republicans had opposed funding the University of Pittsburgh because of the school’s research on fetal tissue.

Later, Mastriano sent a letter to the heads of the four universities linked to the state, asking them to reconsider the tuition increase in light of inflation and a special credit from the governor. “Families in Pennsylvania simply cannot afford rising tuition on top of rising costs in other sectors of the economy,” he wrote.

All four state-linked universities have increased tuition fees in the past year.

Shapiro, during an August visit to State College, said he supported more funding for state-linked universities, but also said those institutions should not raise tuition.

“We are 48th in the country for what we invest in higher education. We need to show that we care about investing in higher education,” Shapiro said, according to information from StateCollege.com.

United Steelworkers District 10, the union that represents Pitt’s faculty, has endorsed Shapiro for governor.

Transparency for

state-linked universities

The state-bound statute exempts universities from most of the open record provisions that PASSHE schools face, except for reporting certain basic financial information and the university’s top 25 salaries.

As a state senator, Mastriano sponsored a bill that would reduce these exemptions for state-related universities. The measure would require schools to make public 175 more of their top salaries, staff information by position, financial information for individual academic units, and college contracts over $10,000, among other things.

Mastriano’s bill passed the Senate, 38 to 12, in September and was sent to the State House for consideration.

In a statement to Spotlight PA, Shapiro’s campaign said the Democratic nominee supports Mastriano’s bill. The campaign said Shapiro, who is the father of a Pitt student, pledged to increase transparency at state-tied universities to measure results and better track state funding.

College debt forgiveness

As attorney general, Shapiro supported President Joe Biden’s proposal to make community colleges free and to make four-year public universities or colleges free for students from families earning less than $125,000.

In a March 2021 letter to the administration, Shapiro wrote that he “welcome President Biden’s commitment to consider using executive power to cancel student debt.”

Mastriano, in his July call for state-linked universities to freeze tuition fees, argued that “The unsustainable borrowing costs of student loans are making the dream of a college degree increasingly out of reach for many families.”

The state senator called Biden’s decision to forgive up to $20,000 in student loans as “irresponsible public spending”.

——

(Editor’s Note: Spotlight PA is an independent, nonpartisan newsroom powered by The Philadelphia Inquirer in partnership with PennLive/The Patriot-News, TribLIVE/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, and WITF Public Media. If you’ve learned anything of this story, pay it forward and become a member of Spotlight PA so someone else can do so in the future at spotlightpa.org/donate Spotlight PA is funded by foundations and readers like you who are committed to responsible journalism that gets results.)



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Pork industry battles California law in U.S. Supreme Court https://amiyasahu.com/pork-industry-battles-california-law-in-u-s-supreme-court/ Mon, 10 Oct 2022 21:26:49 +0000 https://amiyasahu.com/pork-industry-battles-california-law-in-u-s-supreme-court/ Industry groups appeal ruling that backed California law At issue is the Commerce Clause, the United States Constitutional provision WASHINGTON, Oct 10 (Reuters) – The U.S. Supreme Court is set to hear arguments on Tuesday in an industry challenge to the constitutionality of a California animal welfare law in a case that could undermine the […]]]>
  • Industry groups appeal ruling that backed California law
  • At issue is the Commerce Clause, the United States Constitutional provision

WASHINGTON, Oct 10 (Reuters) – The U.S. Supreme Court is set to hear arguments on Tuesday in an industry challenge to the constitutionality of a California animal welfare law in a case that could undermine the power of states to regulate a range of issues within their own borders.

The National Pork Producers Council and the American Farm Bureau Federation are appealing a lower court’s decision to dismiss their lawsuit seeking to strike down a 2018 ballot initiative passed by voters banning the sale in California of pork, calves and eggs from animals whose containment has not met the minimum space requirements.

The pig industry has defended the size of cages used on pig farms as humane and necessary for animal safety. Animal rights groups have said some pork producers confine mother pigs to cages so small the animals cannot turn around for most of their lives.

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Industry groups have argued that the measure, called Proposition 12, violates a provision of the US Constitution known as the Commerce Clause, which gives Congress the power to regulate interstate commerce, by requiring outside producers to comply or face a California sales ban. A legal doctrine called the “dormant” Commerce Clause prohibits states from passing laws that discriminate against commerce in other states.

Proposition 12 violates that doctrine, hog producers argued in a legal filing, because it would increase costs for hog farmers, almost all of whom are located outside of California. While being the most populous US state and an important market, California produces only 0.1% of the country’s pork.

“If you’re looking for an example of unconstitutional law, this is it,” said Michael Formica, chief legal strategist for Pork Producers.

Proponents of the law disagree, saying California has the right to set standards for products sold to its consumers, regardless of where they are produced.

“There’s a long history of state laws that have to do with protecting public health, food safety, and animal welfare,” said Josh Balk, vice president of animal welfare. animal husbandry at the Humane Society of the United States, which led the campaign to pass the proposal. 12 and is a party to the case. “Producers have a choice if they want to sell products within state lines that meet this standard.”

The United States Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit, based in San Francisco, upheld a district court’s decision to dismiss the lawsuit, finding no violation of the Commerce Clause.

President Joe Biden’s administration has sided with pork producers, saying in a Supreme Court brief that states cannot ban products “that pose no threat to public health or safety on the basis of philosophical objections”.

“SPECTACULAR EXPANSION”

A ruling by the Supreme Court, which has a 6-3 conservative majority, favoring the pork industry would have major implications for the interpretation of the Commerce Clause, some legal experts say.

The industry is “calling for a dramatic expansion of the doctrine in a way that would challenge all kinds of state law,” attorney Brian Frazelle of the liberal advocacy group Constitutional Accountability Center, who filed a brief in the case in the name of the law. teachers, told reporters on a conference call.

Sixteen liberal U.S. senators, including the two from California, had urged the Biden administration to back the law. They wrote that a ruling endorsing the industry’s position on the Commerce Clause “could allow large, multi-state corporations to escape many state laws that focus on harming their constituents, including including those dealing with wildlife trafficking, climate change, renewable energy, trafficking in stolen goods and labor abuses.”

A group of 20 mostly Republican-ruled states, led by Indiana, said in a brief that keeping Proposition 12 would undermine state sovereignty. Another group of 14 mostly Democratic-ruled states and the District of Columbia, led by Illinois, said overthrowing it would undermine the state’s authority to legislate.

According to Nandan Joshi, an attorney with consumer advocacy group Public Citizen, which filed a brief in favor of California, a ruling favoring pork producers could inspire more industry challenges to state regulations.

Urged by animal welfare and consumer groups, many food and catering companies have already pledged to phase out small confinements for pigs and buy or produce cage-free eggs.

Proposition 12, passed with the support of about 63% of California voters, sets the space requirement for breeding pigs, or sows, at 24 square feet (2.2 square meters). The current industry standard is between 14 and 20 square feet (1.3 to 1.9 square meters), according to a 2021 report by Dutch banking and financial services company Rabobank.

The measure also increased the space required to house laying hens and calves reared for veal.

Major U.S. pork producer Smithfield Foods, owned by China’s WH Group Ltd (0288.HK), said last year it planned to comply with the law. Kansas-based Seaboard Foods, the second-largest U.S. pork producer, said this year it was converting some of its production to come into compliance.

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Reporting by Leah Douglas; Editing by Will Dunham

Our standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

Lea Douglas

Thomson Reuters

Award-winning Washington-based journalist covering agriculture and energy, including competition, regulation, federal agencies, corporate consolidation, environment and climate, racial discrimination and labor, formerly at Food and Environment ReportingNetwork.

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